International Labor and Employment Law
Erika C. Collins

Erika C. Collins

Partner

Erika C. Collins works with global companies on complex international and cross-border workplace issues, with particular expertise in navigating legal and cultural differences.

Well-known for her knowledge and work around the globe, Erika has developed a network of top-tier employment and employee benefits practitioners that spans 150 countries. She has a finely tuned and unique single point of contact method which allows clients to make just one phone call even when 100 countries may be implicated. Recently, Erika has been assisting a major bank and a major technology company with multi-country reductions in force involving South America, Europe and Asia. Erika helps numerous companies comply with onerous non-U.S. data privacy regulations, such as the EU’s GDPR, and is well-versed in the requirements for transferring employee data to the US.

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“I am what I am, so take me as I am” – Historic decision of India’s highest Court decides gay sex no longer criminal

Commencing with the famous quote of German thinker Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, India’s Supreme Court has today legalised sexual relationships between same-sex people. This landmark decision ends a long fight against Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code 1860 (IPC) which had criminalised certain homosexual acts. In its decision, the Supreme Court held that: “Criminalising … Continue Reading

Puerto Rico Heading Towards At-Will Employment

On May 30, 2018, the Puerto Rican Senate voted in favor of overturning an Act that provided significant protections to Puerto Rican employees. The repeal would roll back the current law, Act No. 80, which prohibits employees from being terminated without just cause, thus making it significantly easier for employers to terminate employees. Currently, private … Continue Reading

China Has a #MeToo Moment, But Still Lacks Anti-Harassment Enforcement

The #MeToo movement may have spread to China, but the legal landscape still does not provide significant protections to potential victims. On January 1, 2018, a former doctoral student at Beijing’s Beihang University, Luo Xixi, posted on Weibo, China’s Twitter, an allegation that her former doctoral supervisor had sexually harassed her while she was a … Continue Reading

Major Changes Proposed to Ontario’s Labor and Employment Laws

On June 1, 2017, the Ontario government introduced the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act (Bill 148).  Bill 148 is not yet the law of the province but, if enacted, it contemplates sweeping changes to both traditional labor and employment law in Ontario.  Broadly, the proposed Bill would raise the minimum wage in Ontario, change employee … Continue Reading

What Employers Need to Know about Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation

Proskauer has released a white paper on “What Employers Need to Know about Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation.” As you may know, on April 14, 2016, the European Parliament approved the General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”), which will replace the EU’s current data privacy standard and begin to apply on May 25, 2018. This paper … Continue Reading

Update: India’s Parliament Passes Increased Maternity Leave

India’s Parliament has officially passed an increase to maternity leave in India.  The new law entitles most mothers to 26 weeks of paid leave. We last reported that India’s Upper House of Parliament approved the increase in August, 2016.  However, India’s lower house held off approving the legislation until last week.  The new law provides … Continue Reading

UK Employment Tribunal Rules that Individuals Working in the “Gig Economy” are Entitled to Paid Leave

An Employment Tribunal in the United Kingdom ruled that a bicycle courier for CitySprint, a delivery firm, was a worker rather than self-employed and therefore entitled to paid leave.  This is the most recent decision in a string of UK cases dealing with the “gig economy,” namely, repeated short-term work such as ride-sharing or courier … Continue Reading

UK Tribunal Allows Expatriate to Bring Claims in the UK

In Jeffrey v. The British Council 2016, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (“EAT”) ruled that an employee who had an “exceptional degree of connection” with the United Kingdom could bring claims in the UK even though he had been working outside of the UK for over 20 years. This provides an important exception to the general … Continue Reading

EU Advocate General Holds that Certain Forms of Indirect Religious Discrimination Could be Justified

On May 31, 2016, the Advocate General (“AG”) of the European Court of Justice issued its opinion in a case relating to a Muslim employee wearing a headscarf at work. In the case, Samira Achbita v. G4S Secure Solutions NV, Case C-157/15, the AG stated that a neutral policy prohibiting employees from wearing visible religious … Continue Reading

UK Tribunal Defines Some Limits on Employee Privacy Protections and Expands Anti-Discrimination Rights

Employee’s Privacy Rights European courts continue to grapple with the limits on employee protections under Article 8 of the European Convention of Human Rights.  Article 8 protects a person’s right to respect for their private and family life, and our blog has actively tracked developments on the subject (to review prior rulings, see here, here, … Continue Reading

New Law Imposes Additional Requirements on NGOs Operating in China

Until recently, there have been few formal regulations regarding the operation of foreign non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in China. While the Chinese government has expressed skepticism and, at times, hostility toward foreign NGOs, many NGOs – including many prominent U.S. based organizations – currently operate in China. Based on new legislation in China, however, the status … Continue Reading

German Labor Court Allows Review of Employee’s Browsing History

European courts continue to clarify the right of employers to review their employees’ emails. As we discussed previously, the European Court of Human Rights and the National Labor Relations Board of the U.S. have recognized that employers have the right to monitor their employees’ internet communications in order to ensure productivity during work. (To review … Continue Reading

Ontario’s Sexual Harassment Protections Passed

Ontario’s Sexual Violence and Harassment Action Plan Act was passed and received Royal Assent on March 8, 2016. The Act will go into effect in six months on September 8, 2016. The Act creates new duties for employers to prevent and investigate sexual harassment in the workplace. To fully review the changes coming in the next six … Continue Reading

Termination for Offensive Social Media Posts May Be a “Reasonable Response” in the UK

The UK Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) recently considered two unfair dismissal cases in which an employer terminated an employee for inappropriately posting on personal Twitter or Facebook accounts. In both cases the EAT overturned the tribunal judge’s ruling for the employee; remanding one case for failure to apply the reasonable responses test and declaring the … Continue Reading

Germany Adopts EU’s Pension Directive, and May Place Burdens on Employers’ Use of Temporary Workers

Pension Law On December 18, 2015, the German legislature approved a law that adopted the pension provisions of the EU Mobility Directive. The Directive was passed to enhance worker mobility between EU countries by requiring stronger pension protections, yet some EU member countries have yet to adopt the pension provisions of the Directive. The new … Continue Reading

Full Disclosure: An Overview of Global Supply Chain Regulations

You may have read our recent client alert on the UK Modern Slavery Act and Global Supply Chain Transparency, where we highlighted the extraterritorial safeguards against human trafficking and slavery as well as the corresponding implications for US-based employers. What you may not know, however, is that although the UK Modern Slavery Act is the … Continue Reading

What Multinational Employers Need to Know about Ontario’s Proposed Sexual Harassment Protections

After adopting an action plan to stop sexual violence and harassment in March 2015, Ontario’s legislature is taking steps to pass an act that would create new duties for employers to prevent and investigate sexual harassment in the workplace. If passed, the act would go into effect six months after it is signed. The act, … Continue Reading

European Court of Human Rights Rules Employers Can Read Employees’ Emails

Last month, the European Court of Human Rights (“ECHR”), in the case of Barbulescu v. Romania, issued a ruling about the rights of employers to monitor their employees’ online communications, including those via personal email and social media accounts. The decision has attracted considerable publicity. Many headlines have implied that it gives employers carte blanche … Continue Reading
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