International Labor and Employment Law

Category Archives: Compensation & Benefits

Subscribe to Compensation & Benefits RSS Feed

Ireland Moves Forward with New Parental Leave Policies

The President of Ireland is on track to sign into law a new amendment to parental leave laws after the country’s upper house (“Seanad Éireann”) approved it on May 8, 2019. The law had previously passed the lower house (“Dáil Éireann”) on June 13, 2018. The amendment now returns to Dáil Éireann for final approval before … Continue Reading

Major Changes to Singapore’s Employment Act, Effective April 1, 2019

Major changes to Singapore’s Employment Act (“EA”) took effect on April 1, 2019. First, the EA was expanded to include more employees and offer greater protections. Before April 1, the EA’s core provisions excluded managers and executives earning more than S$4,500, and its Part IV provisions, which provide additional protection to select groups of workmen … Continue Reading

2019 Brings Minimum Wage Increases Across the European Union

The New Year has brought an increase in minimum wages across the majority of European Union member countries. While most of these changes have been minimal, France and Spain, in particular, announced considerable increases to their respective minimum wages at the end of 2018. From the beginning of his tenure in May 2017, French President … Continue Reading

Recent UK Ruling Highlights Risks of “Independent Contractor” Status

In most jurisdictions, there is a binary distinction between “independent contractors” and “employees,” with employment rights only afforded to “employees.” In the UK, there is a third class—“worker” —who benefit from certain employment rights, including paid time off and a minimum wage. The case of Addison Lee Ltd. v. Lange and Others provides important guidelines … Continue Reading

UK Employment Tribunal Rules that Individuals Working in the “Gig Economy” are Entitled to Paid Leave

An Employment Tribunal in the United Kingdom ruled that a bicycle courier for CitySprint, a delivery firm, was a worker rather than self-employed and therefore entitled to paid leave.  This is the most recent decision in a string of UK cases dealing with the “gig economy,” namely, repeated short-term work such as ride-sharing or courier … Continue Reading
LexBlog